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Anna Sørensen

Anna Sørensen (f. 1968) is trained at Kunstakademiet (the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts) in Copenhagen between 1989 and 1996. She is a painter and with her distinctive paintings, she is an innovator of brightly coloured, formal painting which has a strong tradition in Danish art.
 
Anna Sørensen works directly on the canvas. The paintings are built up intuitively as a pattern of squares and circles. They float beyond the surface of the painting and are repeated and varied until the entire picture plane is filled. Here and there, this basic pattern is broken by organic, flower-like shapes. Or by structures of a completely different character than that of the basic pattern. The pictures are not static - they hold built-in surprises and contrasts.
 
So, her paintings are not pictures of physical objects that we can go out and see in the real world. They do not represent anything; instead they are about painting as painting. About painting as ornamental, abstract surfaces.
 
At first sight, Anna Sørensen's colour scheme appears harmonious and cheerful. However, when looking more closely, we discover built-in surprises here too. She makes use of the full palette of colours in ways that are unconventional and unpredictable. Contrasting colours are juxtaposed, and right next to them she places shapes of various shades of green, pink or beige.
 
Also, she spans the entire gamut in the way she uses colour as a material. In some places, colour is applied to the canvas in flat expanses of colour and in other places in single strokes forming contour lines of different widths around the shapes. In yet other places, colour is applied in smooth layers and sometimes impasto and directly from the tube.
 
Anna Sørensen creates a vivid universe which is completely her own. It is at one time tightly controlled and intuitive and spontaneous. In principle, her ornaments could continue beyond the edge of the painting, onto the wall and across floor and ceiling. In this way, the paintings can be seen as a fragment of a greater whole - a hole in the wall leading on to an underlying greater, coherent ornamental structure which ties together her paintings.
 
Therefore, it is not of crucial importance whether her paintings are normally square, or whether they are oblong and panel-like. Or whether, instead of being placed on a canvas, the ornaments are placed on one of the ceramic balls that Anna Sørensen also decorates with her ornaments.
Anna Sørensen