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2017

 
Alexander Tovberg: The Creator I (2010). Courtesy of Brask Collection.  Photo: Anders Sune Berg Alexander Tovberg: The Creator I (2010). Courtesy of Brask Collection. Photo: Anders Sune Berg

February 4 - May 28, 2017 Greed
Seven Deadly Sins

 
GREED - Seven Deadly Sins presented by Peter Linde Busk (Danish, born 1973), Steinar Haga Kristensen (Norwegian, born 1980) and Alexander Tovborg (Danish, born 1983).


See images from the exhibition here

In medieval Europe, the Catholic Church created a hierarchy of moral principles which was to be of crucial significance to social development and intellectual life in subsequent eras. Among the seven deadly sins was greed, which, like the others, was described as an expression of man’s rejection of God.

 

But what about today? Is greed still the expression of an immoral life that undermines social cohesion in the name of profit maximization? Or do we rather view greed as a virtue that lubricates the wheels of society? Are enterprise and the artistic workflow associated with greed – and if so, of what kind? Is greed in fact a psychological predisposition in the individual that tells us something about complex and contradictory human emotions? And, as a consequence, have the religious and spiritual dimensions entirely disappeared as a basis for explanation?

 

These are all questions that the three invited artists, Peter Linde Busk, Steinar Haga Kristensen and Alexander Tovborg, wrestle with in the exhibition GREED.

 

The three artists have transformed the museum’s Færch Wing into a total visual staging for the occasion. Just as Christian doctrine was once visualised for the plain congregation through iconostases (screens bearing icons) or edifying narratives in wall paintings, the three artists have created an updated iconographic scheme that reinterprets the concept of greed in a contemporary context.

 

Overall, the exhibition at Holstebro Kunstmuseum has the nature of a kind of secular cathedral, which not only revives a dying form of expression – the monumental fresco – but also amplifies the interplay between architecture, art and the public, as well as political and religious ideology.

 

In their art, Peter Linde Busk, Steinar Haga Kristensen and Alexander Tovborg all address the fundamental conditions of existence, power and powerlessness. In style and expression, their extensive practice is particularly evocative and “soulful” – albeit in different ways, and with different temperaments. Moreover, they all have a special interest in historical, mythological and partially neglected pictorial traditions.

 

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Peter Linde Busk (DK, b. 1973) trained at the Slade School of Fine Art (London), Hunter College of Art (New York), Kunstakademie Düsseldorf and the Royal Academy of Arts (London). He now lives and works in Berlin.

 

Steinar Haga Kristensen (N, b. 1980) trained at Oslo National Academy of the Arts, Sydney College of the Arts and the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. He lives and works in Oslo.

 

Alexander Tovborg (DK, b. 1983) trained at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts and the State Academy of Fine Arts, Karlsruhe. He lives and works in Copenhagen.

 

With GREED Holstebro Kunstmuseum is participating in the overall exhibition entitled “Seven Deadly Sins”: one of the selected strategic projects for the European Capital of Culture – Aarhus 2017. The project has been produced in partnership with Randers Art Museum, Ebeltoft Glass Museum, Horsens Art Museum, the Museum of Religious Art, MUSE®UM and Skovgaard Museum. Each museum has been allocated a deadly sin, which forms the basis of an exhibition realized in connection with the European Capital of Culture year. The general aim of the exhibitions is to reinterpret values in contemporary Western society. They are accompanied by a wide range of events.

 

The exhibition is supported by:

European Capital of Culture – Aarhus 2017, the Augustinus Foundation, Den A.P. Møllerske Støttefond, the Danish Arts Foundation and the Parliamentary Reformation Fund

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